Archive for the ‘pond baskets’ Tag

Ted Matson Workshop at the Round Valley Nursery   Leave a comment

Ed Clark, owner of the nursery arranged for a Ted Matson workshop back in March. Due to stand commitments, shows, vacations, Easter and Mothers Day, most of my weekends have been taken up by something. It is now time to show a little of what went on over that weekend. Ted is always a good teacher. His expertise in a number of plant materials, his love of shohin, and the material provided by Ed were a match made in heaven. The workshop consisted of a two day affair with each day broken into separate morning and afternoon sessions. Each day was a repeat of the morning or afternoon before.

Ted started out by telling us the many attributes of the way Ed was growing the material here. Ted was also savvy of those that think this material is too twisted and has too much movement. Ted explained that these trees over the next couple of years are going to mellow out and become fine bonsai due to pruning and growth on top of growth. Ted explained that having seen material grow for bonsai all over the United states that this material is different because care has been taken to keep the movement up while the plant is growing. Ed doesn’t just stop and allow the tree to twist and turn and then allow it to grow pole straight the next year. There are growers in Southern California mentioned by name that have allowed this to ruin what would have been good material.

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Ted used some trees from the nursery and also brought some material he had bought earlier and worked on it some and then used for demonstration.

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Lunch was provided in the workshop and Lind Clark did a great job with a buffet style lunch. We killed an hour and then hit it again in the afternoon.

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This was some of the people from the afternoon session.

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I worked on two pines during the workshop. One I had bought specifically for the workshop and the other a tree I purchased during the lunch break for the second session.

 

Here is the tree I purchased earlier and worked on in the morning.

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This is what it looked like after the first pruning and some wire. Pretty scary.

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This is what it looks like tonight. I am very happy with its growth, and it looks like there is going to be a good tree in here.

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The second tree was purchased right at the nursery for the workshop. I had brought three others to work on but for some reason this one caught my eye. Ted had said something about these trees that made me pause a little. He said instead of looking for the best ones to work on, sometimes it makes more sense to look for those with the most faults. These are the trees that have character and feeling. So I picked out one that had some faults and will see what I can do with it.

 

This small tree had some reverse taper and lots of wire in the trunk. It had a rather gnarly shape and looked like it could be a good tree later on.

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The tree was pruned and wired.

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This is how the tree looks tonight. It is growing strong and like all Ed’s trees the needles stay firm and short. Lots of choices for an apex and the branches have lots of shoots. I am happy with this one as well.

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Catching up around the yard   2 comments

This is my first spring since my wife was down for a year with cancer. I did not spend any time in the backyard and just watered trees. As the radiation was over last July I was able to catch up on a few things bonsai related but much of the damage was done and I would be playing catch up for a while. Over the winter I was able to repot and get some unfinished business out of the way like pruning and styling of a few trees that had never looked like much.

So this is the fruit of my labor. Still have a ways to go but most stuff is caught up now. Still looking for a place to put trees under construction, but that a never ending job. Lets have a look around the backyard.

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There are 30 shohin on the bench right now with about 12 more coming soon (two or more years). An assortment of elms, pines and tridents still to come

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This California juniper is now in its second year in the grow stones and it has never looked better.

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Ghidorah -1 gat some trimming, a repot into a nice Chinese round Literati pot and a good painting of lime supher.

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Took this tree to the club meeting yesterday and cleaned and oiled the pot, cut back the moss and applied some black/red sifted lava around the moss to dress the top. Some light pruning and wire and I’m done for a couple months.

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Well these two are just growing. They both need help.

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Two recent aquisitions, The Maple last Nov. and the giant cork bark elm a couple months ago.

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The above maple, Oshio Beni is now making leaves. Ther are unfolding each day and I am excited to see the red leaves finally. After thirty one years of bonsai this is the first red leved maple.

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It is pushing very hard and the buds out of the old wood show that.

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The Muranaka pine is sending candles out now.

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Crepe mrytle I purchased last week. Leaves come out red and then turn copper finally green

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The elm root cutting are sending green buds skyward. Leaves are beginning to form and next year training will start on more shohin trees.

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This small 3 inch tall pine from Ed has candles already 14 inches long.

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I have two hornbeam shohin and both are getting ready to unfurl the leaves.

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The ole miss, looking great this year.

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Realville gets a makeover   10 comments

This trident goes by the name Realville. Some day I wish to add small metal tags to the trees and number them so I know which ones are witch. Until that day I just name them. Not all of them have names but sooner or later something comes to me and it sticks. The name comes from the title of a blog post here I did a couple years ago. A search on the home page with “realville” should pull it up.

What I wish to do for this tree is shorten it up to maybe work as shohin. I think it will work but it will take a couple years to achieve. As it stands, the tree has a pretty good trunk and good taper. It has a terrible nebari and eventhough I tried to graft whips to the bottom, they failed and the base looks crappy still. I took the tree to a shohin study group I belong to hear and developed the plan.

So here is the measuring stick I made to measure at a glance the catagory a tree fits into. As we can see the tree is just about 1.5 inches too tall for shohin which is at the top of the orange portion.

 

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I figure that if I layer the tree at the thickest part I can shorten the tree and put a better base on the tree in one throw.

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Leaves fell off and the line is marked at the study group.

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So today I carve a groove all the way around the base of the trunk at the line.

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A large piece of wire is tied around the trunk. The wire is pounded into the trunk tissue and alloed to follow all the curves and indentions.

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Once the wire is affixed a collar is made of plastic canvas for holding the soil.

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A little bit about the soil. This is a bag of akadama I picked up several years ago…maybe about seven. I had no idea what it was that I had. When I opened it I was kinda like …”what the hell is this “.

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The akadama is in round balls. Perfectly round balls. No broken edges, no rough sides, just smooth round balls. It is soft, very soft, and absorbs water like no bodies business. I mean it holds a lot of water. What’s really good about it is that being round, one can see in the picture all the shadows. It is about 60/40, akadama/air. It never compacts and allows perfect air exchange. This stuff grows roots so fast even I am shocked. No hormone here. I have used this on my large trident after the squirrels ate the nebari off and I had roots with this stuff in a collar like this in a few weeks. I have used this medium for all my layers thru the years and am on the look out for a bag to replace this one with. I have about 25% left. I’ll be back in 60 days and brush away some particles and we’ll see what we have.

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Grow Stones and Maples   1 comment

Last year I did two trees as an experiment with the grow stones. Both trees were planted in 100 percent grow stones. I did a conifer that was ailing which would give me a visual indicator during the year if the increased air and drainage was worth the effort. I also did a group of five maples thru a disk with five holes to build a massive taper larger trident. I can say that while the conifer was actually improved and grew very well the trident while not suffering too badly did not thrive in my heat.

I planted the trees as they were in the growing pots about 14 inches tall. The trees wear about 3/4 inch across and were planted thru 1 1/4 inch holes drilled in a ceramic disk. The tree grew and managed to grow to about five feet tall which in itself is good, not good for what they should have done in a year around here. I should have had about nine feet of growth and a good increase in caliper.

All of the trees I planted into disks were left the height they were while they had been growing as single trees. The smaller ones I planted from the seeds the year before were about 10 inches tall. While the small ones did increase in size and layer at the disk intersection, I feel this was because the better and more moisture laden soil they grew in. They all grew in colanders so that part was equal as well.

This year the large group of five in individual holes will be planted into a much more humus rich soil mix. Based on trees grown in previous years, the trees should begin to fill the holes and layer off. I need each one to increase in girth by at least 50 percent to even touch each other and begin grafting. Should take about two more years to get to that point.

The most important part of this project is what was done for this year. Like the trees I did a decade ago, massive girth in the bottom third of the tree will only take place when the shoot emerges from the trunk low on the trunk. Let me explain. When a tree is expected to increase in size, sacrifice branches are used to achieve this. If a tree is 20 inches tall and the sacrifice is used from a bud that emerges from the trunk in the first inch above the soil, that shoot will increase the base of the trunk by a lot over a season. In fact this is a good way to improve reverse taper.

If a person is trying to achieve a large trunk and uses a shoot in the upper third of the trunk, all of the branches adjacent to the shoot will increase in size but the base of the trunk will hardly see any increase in size. Further, all increase in size happens below a sacrifice or adjacent to it. For this project on the large tree as well as the smaller projects I have going, I have cut back all the trunks on the groups of tree thru the plates down to about 2 -3 inches. The larger project was cut down to about 4 inches. This cut back will force all the energy into only the four inches of trunk and swell a lot. If I left the trunks 5 feet long the shoots would only increase the trunks right out on the ends of the trunks, 14 inches away from the holes I need to fill. With the trunks now only four inches tall, the new shoots will direct all the energy into the trunks and they should swell to fill the holes by June. The tree was checked and the buds are swelling and now is the right time to cut the canes. this will now force all the energy into the bottom.

 

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This is how much larger the trees have to grow to fill the holes and begin layering.

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The roots have been covered with a layer of the grow stones as well as what above the tile. just from the fact of being covered with soil the trunks will begin to emit roots.

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Here are the five trunks cut back and ready for next years growth.

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All the trunks were cut back to shoots or buds on the trunk. this is the safest method to insure the trunk will take off when the sap is on the rise.

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Here are some of the other baskets of maples with the trunks all cut back ready for spring. These are all the seedligs I did under the screen. They have good movement as a benifit from the screen.

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This is one of the larger seedlings done from the same batch. It is amazing how fast they grow if they are not stuted by having screen thrown over them. the squirrels did a number on this root connected pair as can be seen in the close up.

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Ed Clark….redux   4 comments

This is the follow up to my post about Ed Clark. While I have several trees from the man he lives a good hour and a half away so I have never taken the time to go see what he has. That was my first mistake.

The nursery is tucked right up next to the foot hills and the canopy of trees and shade structures and hoop houses, of which I seen about five or more with several acres under shade cloth. I was amazed when I started to look around. I could hear a radio blasting country music so I followed the sound. I found Ed there in the midst of several benches of pines busy pulling needles, cutting candles and cleaning weeds out of pots. He was also potting up some material into larger containers. I had mentioned that Ed did not have a lot left from the old days, but I did see quite a few older maples in large containers and he had these cool tridents over some really black limestone type rock. Very cool to see these.

Second mistake, I did not have my camera. I took all these pictures with my Iphone, and while some are really good, some are so so, and some are kinda blurry. I think we can get an idea of the scope and breadth of the place from these photo’s. Keep in mind that back in his commercial nursery days he had no benches. Older now and he said he did not want to bend over if he could help it. he built all the benches you see in the photo’s. Ed told me he spent $5,000.00 just on bench material.

On to the photo’s.

I have tried to break this up into logical blocks of the same kinds of trees, although I walked thro so many hoop houses with benches full of hundreds of pots of trees in age groups. I try to start with the young ones first and move to the larger of the species. Don’t worry too much, it’s all tree porn. Ed Clark showing me around on a drizzly day.

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These are some of those tridents on the black rock that are over 30 years old.

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These are just some odd tridents hanging out on benches.

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These are twisted pomegranate. Ed has hundreds of these all started from cuttings. Many of them have had the wire thing done to them also to try to introduce some movement.

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All the previous photos have been the pomegranates. This bench with those on the right are full of movement also.

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This is some of the material from many years ago. There are large maples in here and many of them are very difficult to find cultivars.

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I wanna go back for this one. I told Ed to save this for me and I will dig it out when down next. Kashima Maple

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Here’s a big block of procumbens with wire.

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I will let the Itoigawa speak for itself. Ed says he has just reached the point where he has enough material to keep the wire going on the trees and adding movement. wire on the pines is easy peasy, Ed says the junipers are more tricky because they break so easy.

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By far Ed has mostly pines that have received the wire. He has house after house full of pines. I would easily estimate there well over a thousand or more trees here.

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In this next photo one can see the small trees on the right that do not have many needles. These are banshosho dwarf pines that have been grafted onto mikawa understock.

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Lets just look at some of these trunks. I was mesmerized and my arms were shaking like a dog shitting peach pits. Blurry yes, but still worth it.

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Here are a couple of shots of young pines with the wire embedded at the beginning of the process. It seems that there are not that many twists and turns, but as it grows and swells it must find new paths to grow which adds all the character.

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Larger pines in baskets. These have been taken from round containers and placed in pond baskets. Here they will bulk up and gain girth for larger shohin type pines.

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My hand for comparison. These trunks are fully 1 1/2+ inches across and about 6 inches tall.

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Pines in long cups for stones. The roots on these are growing length in an effort to merge them to stones in the future.

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Large pines growing out. These pines are in baskets and then buried in these 25 gallon large nursery containers. This provides a controlled setting but gets as much growth as being in the ground.

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My hope is that I can convince Ed for me to style this tree.

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Shohin Repots   8 comments

Some of these have had their soil refreshed, some are in show pots for the first time, and some were up-potted to baskets for further growing out.

This small trident is seeing a show pot for the first time. It is an import Chinese pot I bought from Don Blackmond

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This small trident also see a show pot for the first time. This pot by Dick Ryerson.

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This small mountain maple has been refreshed in its Gary Wood pot.

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This Shishigashira is also refreshed in an import pot from Japan.

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This Trident has been refreshed in a pot from Yamafusa

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I picked up these three new pines from Ed Clark. These pines were grown in four inch nursery pots. These have not been grown in the ground. The trunks currently are about 1 inch and have been grown with wire from whips and the wire allowed to embed and thicken. This is how they looked coming out of the 4 inch pots. plenty of white roots showing they are now pushing sap and growing.

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Teasing out all the roots.

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Cutting back for replant.

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All of the pines were planted in coarse soil in 12 inch pond baskets. This is no.one.

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This is no two. This has the potential to become a pretty good semi cascade.

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This is no. three. This has some really good twists and turns. The trunk is fat, nearly 1.25 across at the bottom, five inches tall and really good taper. This will become a fine shohin bonsai pretty quickly.

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Colander or Colonder?   2 comments

It must be Colonder because my Smart Ass Wife says I have my head up my ass and these will not work cause “these “pots” are full of holes and the soil will just fall out”.

Hah! just go back and take another nap and let me do the growing of trees. She is so helpful that way. I went back to the Super Asia Market and bought another load of baskets for all the projects I have with tridents this year.

The pink baskets I bought last week. This week I bought the larger ones and the smaller ones.

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The green ones are 12″ x 3.5″, pink are 14″ x 5″, first blue is 18″ x 6″ and the big one is 23″ x 7″. I have no idea what I am going to put in the big ones yet. I think Frokensteen will go into the smaller of the two big ones.

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I wish to talk about volume. A five gallon bucket filled to the brim holds 80 percent of a cubic foot. Most bagged soil amendments are sold by the cubic foot on the bag, sometimes it is in dry quarts or similar. The nursery container called a five gallon can at the nursery holds 3.5 gallons. It is pretty close to holding a half a cubic foot. The bucket holds my base mix, pumice and lava 50/50. To this I add the akadama. and sometimes huyga.

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I put the large blue basket in my wheelbarrow and it barely fit. I poured in the contents of the bucket of mix and it came within two inches of the top leveled out.

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On top of that I placed a bag of akadama. A bag of akadama contains half a cubic foot of material. I figure that this container will hold two bags of akadama easily, or about a cubic foot of soil. Thats a pretty big basket.

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This is how much white space was left after pouring the bag of akadama into the bucket.

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Oh I remember now. I know just what I am going to do with the big one. Savin that for a future super duper project.

Posted December 27, 2013 by California Bonsai Art in Repotting

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